Can you smoke while taking garcinia cambogia

Can you smoke while taking garcinia cambogia
One study in the meta-analysis reported a significant decrease in fat mass in the HCA group compared with placebo, two studies reported a significant decrease in visceral fat/subcutaneous fat/total fat areas in the HCA group compared with placebo, but two other studies found no significant difference at all between HCA and placebo.


Best Six Kidney Disease Blogs of 2016 & 2017; winner Top 75 Nephrology Blogs

Tagged with Garcinia Cambogia

Cleaning Out

Today I g et to finish the final edits for my novel Portal in Time and submit it to my publisher. That means the next step is cleaning out my files and my computer. Writers accumulate an awful lot of unnecessary material when researching for a book.

That simple thought got me to thinking about another kind of cleaning out, the body kind. By the way, it seems the words cleanse and detox – short for detoxification – are being used interchangeably. Whichever term we use, are they safe for us as Chronic Kidney Disease patients?

But first – there’s always a first, isn’t there? – a warning: if you’re thinking of doing one for weight loss, don’t. According to Medicine.Net at,

“There is no scientific evidence that “detox” (short for detoxification) or “cleanse” diets result in rapid weight loss or have any health benefits, says Heather Mangieri, RDN, LDN, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and founder of NutritionCheckUp in Pittsburgh.

Indeed, the opposite may be true: One study published in 2011 in the journal Obesity found that beginning a weight-loss diet with a fast or cleanse could be counterproductive.”

Now wait just a minute, if they provide no ‘rapid weight loss or have any health benefits,’ why do people go to the trouble of doing them? I wrote about this just a bit in relation to brain fog in SlowItDownCKD 2015.

“…with CKD I’d talk over detoxing and/or taking supplements to support cell power with my nephrologist before actually following that advice. Some nephrologists are dead (Yikes! Wrong word choice) set against detoxifying while others have a more eclectic approach to gentle detoxifying.”

Ah, so there MAY be some benefits in relation to brain fog. What’s brain fog again? The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2 (I have got to get around to shortening that title.) can help us out here.

“According to integrative medicine expert Dr. Isaac Eliaz, when experiencing brain fog

‘…people feel as if there is a thick fog dampening their mind. While the medical and mental health establishments don’t generally recognize brain fog as a condition, it’s a surprisingly common affliction that affects people of all ages. Symptoms include pervasive absentmindedness, muddled thought processes, poor memory recall, difficulty processing information, disorientation, fatigue, and others.’

Well, what exactly is a detox?

To achieve similar results with store-bought green tea, you'll need to brew two to four cups daily (many varieties can contain 160 to 470 milligrams of catechins per cup).

The Free Dictionary’s medical dictionary at offers this as one of its definitions:

“A short-term health regimen involving procedures thought to remove toxins from the body, such as drinking large amounts of liquid, eating a restricted diet or fasting, taking nutritional supplements, and undergoing enemas.”

Now we get to the meat of the matter. Why do Chronic Kidney Disease patients need to be so careful about cleanses? I looked at the ingredient list of several different cleanses on (Click on the ingredient lists to make them larger so you can read them more carefully.) The first product was Super Colon Cleanse. One of the first ingredients was Psyllium Husk Powder 1 g. Uh-oh. Not good for us. As Metamucil Advisor – the manufacturer of fiber products -at explains,

“Psyllium husk is a natural fiber that comes from the plant called Plantago Ovata. Plantago Ovata produces thousands of seeds that are coated with a gel like substance that is extracted to create psyllium husk. The psyllium husk is a natural soluble fiber laxative that can be consumed to add bulk to the feces. Consuming psyllium powder will draw water to the stool making it easier to have a bowl movement. Psyllium husk is recommended to not be taken by individuals who have kidney disease because it is high in magnesium that individuals with chronic kidney disease must avoid. It is highly recommended to consult your physician before starting any product of psyllium husk to make sure it is safe with any health conditions you might have.”

Well, that’s only one cleanse. Let’s take a look at another. Dr. Tobias Colon: 14 Day Quick Cleanse is composed of herbs, no psyllium. But there’s a problem there, too. As Chronic Kidney Disease patients we are cautioned against taking herbs, not so much because they will cause damage, but because we don’t know how much of each is safe for our kidneys.

I thought I remembered writing about this in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease – another really long title – and decided to find that information. Here it is:

“While none of this is established, the following might be toxic to the kidneys -wormwood, periwinkle, sassafras (I remember drinking sassafras tea as a child. Did that have any effect on my kidneys?) and horse chestnut just to name a few. Then there are the herbal supplements that might be harmful to CKD patients: alfalfa, aloe, bayberry, capsicum, dandelion, ginger, ginseng, licorice, rhubarb and senna.

Natural appetite suppressants — which have some similarities to commercial weight loss pills but some important differences — may help tackle some of these issues related to obesity or emotional eating in part by balancing levels of “hunger hormones,” such as ghrelin and leptin.

While Garcinia Extra had a serving size of two capsules totaling 1000mg, Garcinia plus only had a serving size of 1 capsule totaling 700mg.

There are others, but they seemed too esoteric to include….”

They say three is the magic number, so let’s take another look. This time as something label ‘detox.’ Baetea 14 Day Teatox is the one I chose. I think I liked the play on words: detox, teatox, a tea to detox. Lots of herbs, but then I looked at the last ingredient – Garcinia Cambogia. That rang a caution bell in my mind so I went right to a site about the side effects of this product at

“Our kidneys and liver remove toxins, waste and other substances from our body. They are the main organs designed to clean the body of impurities. People who already have diseases of the kidneys or liver should not take Garcinia Cambogia because their bodies might not be able to utilize and remove the supplement effectively.”

*sigh* It looks like we’ll just have to detox the old fashioned way, with increased fiber, as much water as your nephrologist permits, and exercise. You might consider going meat and sugarless, too. Of course, it wouldn’t hurt to cut down on carbs, either. It looks like we, as Chronic Kidney Disease patients, are moving closer and closer to clean eating.

Troubling New Potential Garcinia Cambogia Side Effect

This popular weight-loss supplement has now been linked to mania, as well as liver damage

The dietary supplement garcinia cambogia has developed a huge following in recent years thanks in part to an aggressive advertising campaign pitching it as a simple way to lose weight and burn fat. One problem: There’s little if any evidence it actually has those effects. And now there's news that current and potential users might have another reason to avoid the supplement: Garcinia cambogia has been linked to mania, a condition marked by euphoria, delusions, and overexcitement.

The new concern comes from three cases detailed in the journal Primary Care Companion for CNS Disorders, which were reported by Brian Hendrickson, M.D., a psychiatrist at New York-Presbyterian Hospital at Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City, and his colleagues.

All three of the patients experienced manic episodes after taking unspecified amounts of garcinia cambogia for a month or longer, Hendrickson says. “They all exhibited classic symptoms of mania such as pressured, very fast speech, a decreased need for sleep, and irritability,” he says.

Two of the patients, a 50-year-old man and a 34-year-old woman, had previously been diagnosed with bipolar disorder, a condition that causes unusual shifts in mood, though in both cases the condition had been under control prior to their most recent episodes.

However, this maybe due to the fact that this brand hasn’t been on the scene as long as the others.

The other patient, a 25-year-old man, had no history of psychiatric illness. And in each case, the patients recovered from their manic episodes when they stopped taking the supplements and were treated with prescription drugs such as lorazepam and olanzapine, which are commonly used to treat mania, Hendrickson says.

While far from conclusively proving that garcinia cambogia causes mania, the cases do raise concerns, Hendrickson says.

He theorizes that garcinia cambogia might trigger manic episodes in people with a history of bipolar disorder, and “unmask” the condition in people who are at risk for bipolar disorder but have never experienced symptoms. For example, the 25-year-old man cited in the recent journal article might have been at an increased risk for developing the disorder and the supplement then might have sparked his initial episode.

An earlier study, in the Journal of Medical Toxicology, suggests that garcinia cambogia might have this effect by increasing the amount of serotonin in the brain, a chemical that helps regulate mood. Flooding the brain with excess serotonin could potentially produce “substance induced” manic episodes. Other substances known to trigger mania include antidepressants and anabolic steroids. In those cases, the mania disappears when the offending substance is discontinued.

“It’s possible that mania is a very rare but important side effect of garcinia cambogia and we’re just seeing it in susceptible people now that the supplement is so widely used,” says Stephen Heymsfield, M.D., a professor at Louisiana State University's Pennington Biomedical Research Center and an expert on garcinia cambogia, who was not involved in the current study.

“In this case the authors have congregated a few cases, but it could just be the tip of the iceberg and it will take further study to really investigate if, in fact, this is a serious adverse event,” Heymsfield says.

Supplements Can Make You Sick

Dietary supplements are not regulated the same way as medications. This lack of oversight puts consumers' health at risk.

Calvin Jimmy Lee-White was tiny. He was born on Oct. 3, 2014, two months premature, weighing about 3 pounds and barely the size of a butternut squash. There are standards of care for treating infants that fragile, and as an attorney for the baby’s family later acknowledged, doctors at Yale-New Haven Hospital in Connecticut followed them. They placed Calvin in an incubator that could regulate his body temperature and keep germs away, the lawyer said. And they administered surfactant drugs, which help promote crucial lung development in premature infants.

There are literally thousands of garcinia cambogia products out there but only a small number really do stand out in the market.

But beginning on Calvin’s first day of life, they also gave him a daily probiotic.

Probiotics are powders, liquids, or pills made up of live bacteria thought to help maintain the body’s natural balance of gut microorganisms. Some neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) have been giving them to preemies in recent years based on evidence that they can help ward off deadly intestinal disease.

Some doctors are concerned about that trend. Because probiotics can be classified as dietary supplements, they don’t have to be held to the same regulatory standards as prescription or even over-the-counter drugs. Manufacturers don’t have to secure Food and Drug Administration approval to sell their products, and their facilities aren’t policed the same way as pharmaceutical companies.

But the NICU at Yale-New Haven chose what looked to be a safe product. It was made by a large, seemingly reputable company, marketed specifically for infants and children, and available at drugstores across the country.

Calvin struggled anyway. His abdomen developed bulges, and surgery revealed that his intestines were overrun by a rare fungus. The infection spread quickly from his gut to his blood vessels, where it caused multiple blockages, and then into his aorta, where it caused a clot.

On Oct. 11, at just 8 days old, baby Calvin died. Government officials then launched a mournful investigation. Where did the fungus come from? And how did it get into this premature baby’s tiny body?

Unproven Treatments

The answer is that the probiotic was contaminated. The FDA tested unopened containers from the same batch of probiotic given to Calvin and discovered the same fungus that had infected his intestines. Certain lots of the product—ABC Dophilus Powder, made by the supplement manufacturer Solgar—were recalled from pharmacies and drugstores across the U.S.

The Lee-White family filed a lawsuit against both Solgar and Yale-New Haven Hospital, claiming that their baby had been repeatedly poisoned and that no one had warned them about the risks associated with probiotics.

“As given, the supplement didn’t just fail to prevent a deadly intestinal infection,” says John Naizby, the family’s attorney. “The supplement actually caused a deadly intestinal infection.” Solgar told Consumer Reports via email that it conducted a thorough investigation in cooperation with the FDA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and found no contaminants at any point in its own supply chain. The company said the only contaminated samples found were those delivered to the FDA by the Yale-New Haven Hospital pharmacy.

The hospital declined to comment for this article.

Ahora, antes de contarte cuanto te va a costar y el lugar donde puedes comprarlo, primero quiero que medites si garcinia cambogia es realmente lo que tu estas buscando.

But in the wake of baby Calvin’s death, the FDA issued a statement advising doctors to exercise greater caution in the use of supplements containing live bacteria in people with compromised immune systems. Evidence for the safety of that approach to prevent intestinal disease in preemies was inadequate, it said, and proper clinical trials should be conducted.

The problem stretches well beyond one tainted probiotic. Dietary supplements—vitamins, minerals, herbs, botanicals, and a growing list of other “natural” substances—have migrated from the vitamin aisle into the mainstream medical establishment. Hospitals are not only including supplements in their formularies (their lists of approved medication), they’re also opening their own specialty supplement shops on-site and online. Some doctors are doing the same. According to a Gallup survey of 200 physicians, 94 percent now recommend vitamins or minerals to some of their patients; 45 percent have recommended herbal supplements as well. And 7 percent are not only recommending supplements but actually selling them in their offices.

Consumers are buying those products in droves. According to the Nutrition Business Journal, supplement sales have increased by 81 percent in the past decade. The uptick is easy to understand: Supplements are easier to get than prescription drugs, and they carry the aura of being more natural and thus safer. Their labels often promise to address health issues for which there are few easy solutions. Want a smaller waistline? There’s garcinia cambogia for that. Bigger muscles? Try creatine. Better sex? Yohimbe. How about giving your brain a boost? Omega-3 fatty acids. Or your energy level? Ginseng.

It’s tough to say what portion of those products pose a risk to consumers. A 2013 report from the Government Accountability Office (GAO) found that from 2008 through 2011, the FDA received 6,307 reports of health problems from dietary supplements, including 92 deaths, hundreds of life-threatening conditions, and more than 1,000 serious injuries or illnesses. The GAO suggests that due to underreporting, the real number of incidents may be far greater.

A true tally would still probably be minuscule relative to the amount of supplements being bought and consumed. But there’s no reliable way to tell whether any given supplement is safe. And the fact remains that dietary supplements—which your doctor may recommend and may sit right alongside trusted over-the-counter medications or just across from the prescription drug counter—aren’t being regulated the same way as drugs.