Does garcinia really work to lose weight

Does garcinia really work to lose weight
Daily supplementation with Pure Garcinia Cambogia can suppress appetite, Nutrition Forest has ensured to follow recommended guidelines, set forth by the most famous dietitian nutritionist and above all our products are manufactured in FDA Inspected Facility under Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP).

Eating to Lose Weight and Build Muscle: How the NFL Does It

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NFL players work out hard, both on the field and in the gym. But for them, training is only part of the equation. They also need to eat right. "If you're only [focused on training] you might not get the body you want, and you may increase your risk of injury," says Leslie Bonci, RD, director of sports nutrition at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and team sports dietitian for the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Contrary to popular belief, eating everything in sight isn't a plus in the NFL. Barry Rubin, head strength and conditioning coach for the Philadelphia Eagles, says having an unhealthy body weight will only slow you down and make you more sluggish and susceptible to injury. "You can't outrun your calories," he says. "If you start doing that, you're going to get hurt and over train."

If you want to get in shape like an NFL pro, you need to eat like an NFL pro. That means getting enough protein and the right balance of nutrients in your diet.

Go Pro…tein

Cincinnati Bengals safety Chris Crocker says, "Diet is very important to me as a player. High protein is my main focus along with incorporating more carbs the night before the game."

There's a reason pro athletes like Crocker won't go anywhere without their protein. It's an essential ingredient in every cell of the body, including the muscles.

During a workout, your body goes into a catabolic state where it's breaking down muscle. Once you're done lifting, you want to put it back into an anabolic state where it builds muscle again. Rob Livingstone, a strength and conditioning professional in Norcross, Ga. who has trained many pro athletes, says, "It's so important post-workout to get something in your body to start that anabolic phase."

Bonci says the goal with eating protein is to optimize performance and build lean muscle mass. Ideally, you want to get in a serving of protein both before and after a workout, she says.

When you eat your protein, don't take it solo. "You've got to have some carbohydrates," Livingstone says. "There's got to be some sugar in that protein to increase the absorption." Carbs not only help your body grow muscle, but they also provide you with fuel for your workout.

A lot of NFL pros get their protein on the go. A quick protein fix in bar or shake form is great when you're at the gym. But it shouldn't be your only source of the nutrient. "To me," Bonci says, "a meal is not a shake or a bar. I think there's something to be said for utensils and chewing. But they really can help somebody get to their goal and they're really convenient. It's a little hard to whip a turkey leg out of your [gym] bag." Bonci recommends using whey protein isolate, a straight shot of protein that you can add to shakes, peanut butter, oatmeal, and just about anything else you eat or drink.

Think Lean

When it's on your plate, which it should be at every meal, protein needs to be the right kind. "My emphasis is lean," Bonci says. "I don't want my players saying, 'I got all of my protein because I ate wings.'" Lean chicken, lean beef, soy, and beans are some of the healthiest protein sources.

During the season, former Tennessee Titan defensive tackle Torrie Griffin was burning so many calories on the field that he had to consume upwards of 8,000 calories each day just to maintain his 290-pound playing weight. "That is, I would say, a standard portion for some of the guys," he says. "I was one of those who had to work to keep the weight on."

Griffin, who is now a certified personal trainer and owner of TTrain Fitness Bootcamp in Atlanta, doesn't recommend the kind of diet he and his teammates ate to stay big. For breakfast, they'd down supersized restaurant portions of waffles, eggs, bacon, grits, and toast. At dinner, they'd pack in two burgers, mac and cheese, and fries. "In general for the linemen, it was three very large meals," Griffin recalls. "I didn't really think about how much of the bad stuff or fat and calories were in the food when we ate out."

The only guys who need to be as huge as defensive linemen are defensive linemen. If you work a desk job and eat like a lineman, the only thing that's going to grow is your belly. Guys who work out but eat nothing but junk food will gain fat on top of their muscle and bulk up. "When you're talking about lean muscle mass, you've got to have a clean diet . a balanced diet of protein and carbohydrates [with a] low level of fat, and lots of fruits and vegetables," Livingstone says.

For that, you're better off taking nutrition tips from the NFL players who keep their diets lighter and cleaner.

Crocker only gets 3,000 to 3,500 calories on days when he trains. "As a free safety, it is best for me to be lighter on my feet so I am able to get to the ball and get to the plays a lot quicker." He says he can cover the field faster when he's a pound or two lighter.

If you're working out three days a week, you can eat about 15 calories per pound of body weight, according to Bonci. Men who work out five days a week can up their calorie count to 20 per pound.

Here are just a few of the extract’s benefits: Prevents carbohydrates from turning into fat Burns fat inside the body Reduces appetite significantly Elevates the metabolism(through several specific processes) Reduces food cravings All of these benefits are what allows people taking Garcinia to lose weight rapidly when they incorporate it into a healthy lifestyle.

That doesn't mean everyone gets a free pass to eat more than 3,000 calories a day, though. "The range of calories you require on a daily basis varies greatly and is dependent upon your weight, your activity level, your age, and your muscle mass," Bonci says. "So one size does not fit all when it comes to determining your calorie cap!"

Your NFL Plate

For most NFL players, eating is a no-brainer. They've got nutritionists on staff, and during the season, they eat three meals a day in the team's cafeteria. If you're not a pro, you need to do the meal planning yourself, but you can incorporate elements from the NFL diet.

There's really no big secret to eating like an NFL pro. It's all about balance.

Your plate should look like this:

  • One-third lean protein (eggs, chicken, turkey, red meat)
  • One-third fruits and vegetables
  • One-third healthy carbs (whole-grain rice, pasta, or bread)

Crocker starts his day with a breakfast of turkey sausage and egg whites with tomatoes and spinach. Lunch is usually a grilled chicken sandwich with a mixed green salad, or sliced ham on wheat with applesauce. And dinner is lean protein -- chicken, pork, or beef -- with brown rice, steamed green beans, and a mixed green salad. If he's hungry between meals, he snacks on cereal bars or fresh fruit.

The bulk of your nutrition should come from what's on your plate. But if you're not getting enough vitamins and minerals from food alone, it's OK to take a daily supplement, Bonci says. Nutritional supplements can help you make up for what you're missing in your diet, but they shouldn't replace it.

"It's very important that the supplement remain a supplement," Livingstone says. "If supplements start to take over the diet, they're not doing their job." Supplements can't provide the same quality of vitamins and nutrients as whole foods like chicken, fruits, and vegetables.

Also, be wary of the specialized supplements marketed to athletes because they're not always safe. Some supplements that are used to increase athletic performance have been linked to side effects like high blood pressure, irregular heartbeat, dizziness, and nausea.

Rob Livingstone, MS, CSCS, SCCC, strength and conditioning professional, Norcross, Ga.

Torrie Griffin, former defensive tackle, Tennessee Titans; certified personal trainer, TTrain Fitness Bootcamp.

Barry Rubin, head strength and conditioning coach, Philadelphia Eagles.

Leslie Bonci, MPH, RD, CSSD, LDN, director of sports nutrition, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center; team sports dietitian, Pittsburgh Steelers.

National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

Does Lipozene Really Work to Lose Weight?

You’ve probably heard the saying “you can’t outrun a bad diet,” but that doesn’t stop people from hoping -- and trying -- to find that miracle pill/exercise/diet that will let them eat what they want AND lose weight. Back in the ‘90s, Fen-Phen was that miracle diet drug, until reports of serious heart-valve issues forced it to be pulled from the market. Then came Meridia, which was also eventually pulled from the market in 2010, due to an increased risk of heart attacks and strokes.

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These days, proponents of natural appetite suppressants are turning toward actual foods -- everything from green tea and cinnamon to hot sauce and flax seeds are touted as the natural way to keep yourself feeling full. It should go without saying that before you take ANY diet or weight-loss supplement of any kind, you should consult your doctor to make sure it’s safe and that it won’t interact with any medications that you’re taking.

How Lipozene Works

Despite the health risks and cautionary tales, that doesn’t keep people from trying to find that “magic pill.” Enter Lipozene. You’ve probably heard about this weight-loss supplement from the barrage of TV ads that promise “dramatic weight-loss results while still eating what you love.”

The popular herbal weight-loss supplement is manufactured by the Obesity Research Institute, and marketed as a “breakthrough” weight-loss product. The main ingredient in Lipozene is glucomannan, a vegetable fiber from the root of the konjac plant. When mixed with water, glucomannan forms an indigestible gel that is supposed to give a feeling of fullness when ingested. However, there are significant questions about its effectiveness as a weight-loss aid, since there have been few scientific studies performed to that end.

A study that the Lipozene website cites was conducted in 1984 and was on glucomannan, not specifically Lipozene. It was also conducted on very small sample size -- 20 obese subjects, who lost an average of 5.5 pounds over an eight-week period.

However, fiber IS an important part of a healthy diet and can help you lose weight -- not because it has any fat-burning properties, but because eating healthy sources of fiber, such as fruits and vegetables, can help you feel more full and leave less room for unhealthy foods in your diet.

Capsule contains: Vegetable Cellulose (non-gelatin vegetarian capsule).

Refills heated higher in the forefront are bad to stream more than bananas for maximum in the bandit.

Studies show that in addition to helping you lose weight, fiber can help lower blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar.

According to Dr. Frank Hu, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and professor of nutrition and epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health, a diet that is high in fiber from food sources, not supplements, can help prevent type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

However, Lipozene is a fiber supplement, not a whole food, which means you’re not getting all the nutrients and health benefits of eating a fiber-rich food such as green beans or broccoli.

Side Effects of Lipozene

The side effects of Lipozene are similar to those from eating a lot of fiber: gas, bloating, stomach pains, cramping and diarrhea. But known adverse reactions to glucomannan supplements in tablet form (Lipozene comes in capsules) also include chest pain, vomiting and difficulty swallowing or breathing.

The Lipozene website says that users “must drink 8 oz. of liquid” with each dose. Without adequate liquid, the glucomannan can cause constipation and/or diarrhea.

Glucomannan also lowers blood glucose levels, which can reduce the need for some diabetic medications. But this can cause loss of control of blood sugar levels, which can be a dangerous situation for diabetics. Diabetics should only take Lipozene and other glucomannan-containing products under the supervision of a physician. Since glucomannan expands, it’s not recommended for people who have esophageal or gut issues, since it could cause blockages in the throat or intestines.

Is Lipozene FDA-Approved?

It’s important to know that the FDA does NOT approve dietary supplements and while it may take action if there are adverse situations that involve a supplement, that action only takes place after a supplement is on the market. Companies that make dietary supplements are not required to get approval from the FDA before making or selling their product.

It’s also worth noting that the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) fined the Obesity Research Institute $1.5 million in in 2005 for making misleading weight-loss claim about two other diet pills, Propolene and FiberThin, which are also fiber-based supplements.

Lipozene Studies

Early research suggests glucomannan may be somewhat effective for weight loss, but no research has focused on Lipozene specifically. In addition, the advertised claims for Lipozene are more impressive than the research results for glucomannan and rely mainly on anecdotal experiences in personal testimonials. Lipozene is also generally more expensive than many other brands containing the same active ingredient, products which are available at health food stores from well-known supplement manufacturers.

The Bottom Line on Lipozene

While Lipozene IS a fiber-based dietary supplement and there’s proof that fiber is part of a healthy diet, there’s scant evidence that proves that a pill alone can help you lose weight. Meanwhile, there are plenty of studies and research that do prove that you can close weight by eating a diet that is rich in healthy, whole foods -- combined with exercise and other lifestyle changes.

Garcinia Cambogia: Does This Hyped Weight Loss Supplement Really Work?

Garcinia cambogia (GC) is a small, pumpkin-shaped fruit that grows in Southeast Asia and India. The key active ingredient found in the rind of garcinia cambogia is hydroxycitric acid (HCA), which some research suggests can help certain people lose weight. (1)

Currently, there are at least 14 separate HCA-containing products sold over-the-counter to consumers labeled as “garcinia cambogia.” Most people are drawn to the idea of using GC because of the potential that it can provide near-effortless, quick weight loss without the need to change someone’s overall diet or lifestyle very much.

GC itself is not a new product; in fact, it’s been consumed in parts of Asia for many years, although not for the purpose of losing weight. Since GC (traditionally also known as the Malabar tamarind) first began to gain popularity in the U.S. several years ago — after appearing frequently in the media and on popular health-related TV shows — sales have gone up dramatically. More and more people are purchasing this so-called “weight loss miracle drug” in hopes of losing stubborn body and stomach fat they’ve been struggling with for years.

But just like most other weight-loss supplements, pills and products, studies regarding GC’s effects and safety have been mixed. While there’s some evidence that HCA might be able to aid in weight loss even when someone does not exercise often or change his or her diet very much, there’s also concerns regarding serious side effects that can occur, including liver damage or failure, anxiety, fatigue, dizziness, and digestive problems.

Remember that just because GC is derived from a natural fruit doesn’t mean it’s always completely safe.

Other claims that are commonly made about garcinia cambogia’s effects include: loss of appetite or less of a desire to eat than usual reduced cravings for unhealthy foods, such as sugar addiction a more positive mood (including feeling happier, more energetic and less tired) increased energy and concentration stabilized blood sugar levels improved bowel movements reduced joint pains improved cholesterol levels stronger desire to be physically active Most of the claims above have not been backed by scientific studies, however some have.

So is garcinia cambogia ultimately worth trying? What’s the truth with this purported weight-loss supplement? Let’s take a look at how HCA works, in what situations GC might be helpful, and what adverse reactions are possible when using any type of weight loss drug.

Finally, it’s worth considering the fact that time and time again we see various fad diets and products publicized to help boost weight loss — but what really works in the end is living a healthy lifestyle long term.

Does Garcinia Cambogia Work? What the Studies Tell Us

Garcinia cambogia reviews, research results and weight loss testimonials have been mixed to say the least. By far the most well-publicized benefit of using garcinia cambogia is its ability to increase weight loss. Other claims that are commonly made about garcinia cambogia’s effects include:

  • loss of appetite or less of a desire to eat than usual
  • reduced cravings for unhealthy foods, such as sugar addiction
  • a more positive mood (including feeling happier, more energetic and less tired)
  • increased energy and concentration
  • stabilized blood sugar levels
  • improved bowel movements
  • reduced joint pains
  • improved cholesterol levels
  • stronger desire to be physically active

Most of the claims above have not been backed by scientific studies, however some have. Let’s review the benefits of garcinia cambogia that actually have some merit and seem to be effective in some manner.

Some studies have found that garcinia cambogia might, in fact, be able to help with low amounts of fat loss, plus some of the other health concerns mentioned above, although its effectiveness is rarely strong or consistent. For example, research suggests that HCA works by blocking a certain enzyme called adenosine triphosphate-citrate-lyase, which contributes to the formation of fat cells. But studies comparing GC’s effects to controls have found that it might only increase weight loss by a mere one to two pounds on average.

These findings are exactly what researchers published in the Journal of Obesity in 2011. When they compared people who took garcinia cambogia extract to those who didn’t, the weight difference was very small (on average just about two pounds). Plus, it wasn’t even possible to conclude that GC was directly responsible for the additional pounds lost.

The meta-analysis reviewed results from 12 different trails involving GC and revealed a small, statistically significant difference in weight loss favoring use of garcinia cambogia products containing HCA slightly over use of a placebo. However, the analysis also found that some studies showed digestive side effects (“gastrointestinal adverse events”) were twice as common in HCA groups compared with placebo.

Results from various weight loss studies involving GC have been very mixed. One study in the meta-analysis reported a significant decrease in fat mass in the HCA group compared with placebo, two studies reported a significant decrease in visceral fat/subcutaneous fat/total fat areas in the HCA group compared with placebo, but two other studies found no significant difference at all between HCA and placebo. A study that was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that GC used for 12 weeks (1,500 milligrams dosage) “failed to produce significant weight loss and fat mass loss beyond that observed with placebo.” (2)

The conclusion of the meta-analysis regarding garcinia cambogia? Researchers summed up their findings by saying that “the magnitude of the effects are small, and the clinical relevance is uncertain. Future trials should be more rigorous and better reported.” (3) The bottom line is that if you’re struggling to lose weight, GC likely won’t be the answer, according to trial and controlled studies.

Studies have also suggested that it’s possible that HCA found in garcinia cambogia can help lower someone’s appetite by increasing production of the neurotransmitter serotonin, which is associated with calm and happy feelings — and therefore, sometimes appetite suppression, less cravings and reduced desire for comfort foods. Animal studies show it might also help increase energy expenditure. (4)

Keep in mind, however, that this isn’t the case with all people, and there are other, potentially less risky ways to better manage your appetite and boost serotonin production (such as eating balanced meals with protein foods and healthy carbs at regular times throughout the day).

There’s some support for garcinia cambogia being able to improve cholesterol levels and lower high triglycerides.

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It might also be able to help raise HDL “good” cholesterol. It’s not safe for anyone already taking medications that affect cholesterol, however, and its effects don’t seem to be very reliable or strong.

Studies have found that GC has “no significant effect on anthropometric parameters, REE, triglycerides or glucose levels” but might have a small effect on lowering cholesterol. (5) Keep in mind that there are also plenty of other natural ways to improve cholesterol levels, including exercising and eating more dietary fiber from high-fiber foods like veggies, nuts, seeds and beans.

Finally, what about CG’s effects on blood sugar levels? Some evidence exists showing that garcinia cambogia can help control blood sugar by improving how cells take up glucose (sugar) to be used for energy. One way in which it might improve weight loss is through inhibition of pancreatic alpha amylase enzymes, changes in intestinal alpha glucosidase and alterations in fatty acid synthesis. This might be able to change how carbohydrates are metabolized. (6)

This might possibly help your body respond to insulin better, although it can raise the risk for having low blood sugar levels in some people, too. If you have a history of blood sugar swings, you’re prediabetic, diabetic or taking medications that alter insulin’s effects, GC might make your blood sugar drop dangerously low. While this doesn’t appear to happen in everyone who takes GC, it’s something else to consider and something to discuss with your doctor.

Potential Garcinia Cambogia Side Effects

While some people claim they don’t experience any side effects at all from using GC, others have had very different experiences. Here’s one disturbing account regarding the use of garcinia cambogia extract that you might not have heard about: It’s contributed to at least several patients winding up in the hospital with liver failure and needing emergency liver transplants.

A 2016 article published by the Transplantation Center at the Mayo Clinic reports that millions of Americans regularly use herbal supplements, often in pill form, but aren’t aware of their full effects. Many weight loss drugs pose potential hidden dangers and are “associated with hepatotoxicity and acute liver injury.” (7)

In the case of garcinia cambogia, it can easily be overused and is not very well-regulated. Some manufacturers recommend taking high doses multiple times per day, for example 30 to 60 minutes before every meal for eight to 12 weeks straight. (8) Aside from liver damage, other garcinia cambogia side effects that can occur include:

  • becoming fuzzy or weak
  • fatigue and brain fog
  • skin rashes
  • an increase in catching colds/lower immune function
  • dry mouth and bad breath
  • headaches
  • digestive issues like nausea, trouble eating or diarrhea

Something else to consider about GC is the long list of its potential medical/drug interactions. Many people should avoid garcinia cambogia due to how it can affect other medications, pregnancy, nutrient levels, blood sugar and more. Garcinia cambogia can potentially interact badly with: (9)

  • pregnancy and breastfeeding
  • existing cases of liver or kidney damage
  • medications that are taken to control asthma and allergies
  • diabetes medications and insulin
  • iron supplements (usually taken by people with anemia)
  • pain medications
  • medications used to control mental disorders like anxiety and depression
  • statin drugs that lower cholesterol
  • blood thinning drugs (like warfarin)

How Much Garcinia Cambogia Should You Take?

If you decide that you still want to try taking GC for weight loss or its other benefits, here’s what you need to know about dosage recommendations for products containing HCA:

  • Studies using GC have used a wide range of doses, anywhere from one gram to 2.8 grams daily. Typical doses are ususally between 250–1,000 milligrams per day.
  • Study durations have also varied widely, ranging from using GC between two to 12 weeks at a time.
  • The optimal dose of HCA is currently still unknown. It’s not clear if a higher HCA dosage even means a higher bioavailability of HCA once consumed.
  • There does seem to be a significant correlation between the dosage of HCA and body weight loss, meaning higher doses have slightly more effects.
  • Garcinia cambogia continues to be the most widely used supplement in studies for providing HCA, however aside from GC, HCA can also be found in supplements made from the plant Hibiscus subdariffa.
  • Because most studies have investigated the effects of GC taken for about eight weeks, researchers believe this is ultimately “too short a time to assess the effects of HCA on body weight.”

To err on the safe side, avoid buying garcinia cambogia “formulas” or “supplement blends,” which might fail to report all of the other ingredients included or accurate levels of HCA.

Since you can get it for free as an offer, you don’t have to get frustrated about paying for another product that you’re not certain about.

Many proprietary formulas are made by manufacturers that only use a fraction of the active ingredient or standard dose to keep costs down. Always read labels and look for the words “pure garcinia cambogia” and “hydroxycitric acid (or HCA) extract” (this should be around 50 percent to 60 percent of the product). If you purchase a blend and see an ingredient listed without an amount, that can be a red flag that you don’t know exactly what you’re getting.

11 Weight Loss Methods That Really Do Work

In just about all studies involving garcinia cambogia, researchers note that it’s hard to tell if any demonstrated benefits (weight loss, reduced cholesterol, etc.) are really due to GC or are actually influenced by other factors like the subjects eating lower-calorie diets or exercising. It’s always possible for any supplement to cause a “placebo effect,” where subjects wind up changing their outlook and habits simply because they believe the product is helping them (even if it isn’t actually doing anything).

Another interesting fact that the Journal of Obesity meta-analsis reports is that most of the included studies “failed to indicate whether or not outcome assessors were blinded, and seven studies did not even specify who funded the garcinia cambogia studies.” While it’s possible that garcinia cambogia might help you lose an additional one to two pounds if you take it regularly, most experts don’t think it’s worth the money or the risk — especially considering its effects are so small and inconsistent.

Ultimately, taking weight loss supplements won’t teach you much about eating an overall healthy diet, finding ways to enjoy exercise, or practicing “intuitive eating” and managing cravings. So what can you do to move in the right direction of losing weight safely? Weight loss efforts should always be realistic, safe and sustainable. Remember that the real goal is to reach a healthy weight and stay there for life. That’s why quick fixes and fad diets have been shown in studies to fail in the long run over 95 percent of the time.

Here are some of my favorite tips for losing weight using reliable methods that really work:

  1. Get good sleep! A lack of sleep (less than seven to nine hours nightly for most people) can mean a lack of weight loss.
  2. Eat more fiber: Adults need to aim for at least 25–30 grams daily from things like veggies, fruit, ancient grains, sprouted legumes and seeds.
  3. Use healthy fats: Coconut oil has natural fat-burning effects just like GC does, plus many more benefits like improving gut health, too. Other healthy fats that can help control your appetite include real olive oil, avocado, fats from grass-fed beef, nuts and seeds.
  4. Utilize adaptogen herbs: Adaptogen herbs like maca, ginseng and rhodiola can help control health conditions that can make it hard to lose weight (like high amounts of stress, thyroid issues, leaky gut, adrenal fatigue, cellular toxicity and candida).
  5. Don’t skimp on protein: Protein foods are satisfying and essential for building muscles. Regularly include proteins like cage-free eggs and wild-caught fish in your meals.
  6. Consume probiotics: Probiotic foods and supplements not only help balance improve digestive health, but they also balance hormones, raise immunity, control your appetite and play a part in weight control.
  7. Switch up your exercise routine: Try burst-training exercises and other forms of high intensity interval training (HIIT) to keep challenging your muscles, work in with a group, add in weight training, and relax with yoga in between workouts.
  8. Stand up more during the day: Sitting for long periods of time is associated with being overweight and a higher risk for obesity.
  9. Sneak more fitness into your day: Take the stairs, do body weight exercises at home. or try wearing a fitness tracker for motivation — try some of these exercise hacks.
  10. Schedule your workouts ahead of time: This makes it much more likely you’ll follow through.
  11. Useessential oils for weight loss: Natural oils including grapefruit, cinnamon and ginger oil can help control your appetite, hormones and digestive symptoms.

From the sound of it, you might think leaky gut only affects the digestive system, but in reality it can affect more. Because Leaky Gut is so common, and such an enigma, I’m offering a free webinar on all things leaky gut.