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It also includes calcium (50mg), potassium (50mg) and Chromium 200mcg.

Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018.

Hammerstein continued his subtle quest for racial equanimity in Oklahoma!

In recent days, there has been a subtle feeling of defeat permeating through the camp.

Vreeland believes that in the end, his grandmother put her subtle seal of approval on his lifestyle.

Light amber in color with a subtle sour finish, Fula is one of Casa Bruja's best sellers.

For those who have a problem with that, she offered a charming, subtle middle finger.

He had breathed into the atmosphere a subtle malaria, and George had caught the disease.

Then, he bethought himself of a subtle form of rebuke by emphasizing his generosity.

The words were uttered with a subtle renunciation that was this man's religion.

Joe was not subtle, not even clever; but he was a lover, and he knew the ways of love.

Though I felt a subtle and wondrous change, I could not trace or track the miracle.

© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins

Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

c.1300, sutel, soutil , in reference to things, "of thin consistency;" in reference to craftsmen, "skilled, clever," from Old French soutil , from Latin subtilis "fine, thin, delicate, finely woven," from sub "under" (see sub-) + -tilis , from tela "web" and texere "to weave" (see texture). The spelling with -b- reflects confusion with subtile. Most non-material senses were present by late 14c.

Third Trimester of Pregnancy

In this Article

In this Article

In this Article

Now that you've reached the third trimester, you're in the home stretch of your pregnancy. You've only got a few more weeks to go, but this part of your pregnancy can be the most challenging.

Video Transcript

WebMD Pregnancy App.

In this article, you'll learn what to expect during your third trimester of pregnancy. You'll find out which symptoms are normal, and which ones may warrant a call to your doctor.

Changes in Your Body

Backache. The extra weight you've gained is putting added pressure on your back, making it feel achy and sore. You might also feel discomfort in your pelvis and hips as your ligaments loosen to prepare for labor . To ease the pressure on your back, practice good posture. Sit up straight and use a chair that provides good back support. At night, sleep on your side with a pillow tucked between your legs. Wear low-heeled, comfortable shoes with good arch support. To relieve back pain , use a heating pad and ask your doctor whether it's OK for you to take acetaminophen .

Bleeding. Spotting may sometimes be a sign of a serious problem, including placenta previa (the placenta grows low and covers the cervix ), placental abruption (separation of the placenta from the uterine wall), or preterm labor . Call your doctor as soon as you notice any bleeding.

Braxton Hicks contractions. You might start to feel mild contractions, which are warm-ups to prepare your uterus for the real labor to come.

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Braxton Hicks contractions often aren't as intense as real labor contractions, but they may feel a lot like labor and can eventually progress to it. One main difference is that real contractions gradually get closer and closer together -- and more intense. If you're red in the face and out of breath after your contractions, or they're coming regularly, call your doctor.

Breast enlargement . By the end of your pregnancy, your breasts will have grown by as much as 2 pounds. Make sure you're wearing a supportive bra so your back doesn't suffer. Close to your due date , you may start to see a yellowish fluid leaking from your nipples. This substance, called colostrum, will nourish your baby in the first few days after birth.

Discharge . You might see more vaginal discharge during the third trimester. If the flow is heavy enough to soak through your panty liners, call your doctor. Close to your delivery date, you might see a thick, clear, or slightly blood-tinged discharge. This is your mucus plug, and it's a sign that your cervix has begun dilating in preparation for labor. If you experience a sudden rush of fluid, it may mean that your water has broken (although only about 8% of pregnant women have their water break before contractions begin). Call your doctor as soon as possible after your water breaks.

Fatigue . You might have been feeling energetic in your second trimester, but are weary now. Carrying extra weight, waking up several times during the night to go to the bathroom, and dealing with the anxiety of preparing for a baby can all take a toll on your energy level. Eat healthy food and get regular exercise to give yourself a boost. When you feel tired, try to take a nap, or at least sit down and relax for a few minutes. You need to reserve all your strength now for when your baby arrives and you're really not getting any sleep.

Frequent urination . Now that your baby is bigger, the baby's head may be pressing down on your bladder . That extra pressure means you'll have to go to the bathroom more frequently -- including several times each night. You might also find that you're leaking urine when you cough , sneeze, laugh, or exercise. To relieve the pressure and prevent leakage, go to the bathroom whenever you feel the urge and urinate completely each time. Avoid drinking fluids right before bedtime to cut down on unwanted late-night bathroom visits. Wear a panty liner to absorb any leakage that does occur. Let your doctor know if you experience any pain or burning with urination. These can be signs of a urinary tract infection .

Heartburn and constipation . They're caused by extra production of the hormone progesterone, which relaxes certain muscles -- including the muscles in your esophagus that normally keep food and acids down in your stomach , and the ones that move digested food through your intestines . To relieve heartburn, try eating more frequent, smaller meals throughout the day and avoid greasy, spicy, and acidic foods (like citrus fruits).

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What Garcinia Cambogia Extract Really Is Though garcinia cambogia extract is widely known, not a lot of people really understand what it is and how it works.

For constipation, increase your fiber intake and drink extra fluids to keep things moving more smoothly. If your heartburn or constipation is really bothering you, talk to your doctor about what medications may be safe for you to take for symptom relief.

Hemorrhoids . Hemorrhoids are actually varicose veins -- swollen veins that form around the anus . These veins enlarge during pregnancy because extra blood is flowing through them and the weight of pregnancy increases the amount of pressure to the area. To relieve the itch and discomfort, try sitting in a warm tub or sitz bath. Ask your doctor whether you can also try an over-the-counter hemorrhoid ointment or stool softener .

Shortness of breath. As your uterus expands, it rises up until it sits just under your rib cage, leaving less room for your lungs to expand. That added pressure on your lungs can make it more difficult to breathe. Exercising can help with shortness of breath. You can also try propping up your head and shoulders with pillows while you sleep.

Spider and varicose veins. Your circulation has increased to send extra blood to your growing baby. That excess blood flow can cause tiny red veins, known as spider veins, to appear on your skin . Spider veins may get worse in your third trimester, but they should fade once your baby is born. Pressure on your legs from your growing baby may also cause some surface veins in your legs to become swollen and blue or purple. These are called varicose veins. Although there's no way to avoid varicose veins, you can prevent them from getting worse by:

  • Getting up and moving throughout the day
  • Wearing support hose
  • Propping up your legs whenever you have to sit for long periods of time.

Varicose veins should improve within a few months after you deliver.

Swelling. Your rings might be feeling tighter these days, and you may also notice that your ankles and face are looking bloated. Mild swelling is the result of excess fluid retention ( edema ). To reduce swelling, put your feet up on a stool or box whenever you sit for any length of time, and elevate your feet while you sleep. If you have sudden onset of swelling though, seek medical attention immediately as it may be a sign of preeclampsia, a dangerous pregnancy complication.

Weight gain. Aim for a weight gain of 1/2 pound to 1 pound a week during your third trimester. By the end of your pregnancy, you should have put on a total of about 25 to 35 pounds (your doctor may have recommended that you gain more or less weight if you started out your pregnancy underweight or overweight ). The extra pounds you've put on are made up of the baby's weight, plus the placenta, amniotic fluid , increased blood and fluid volume, and added breast tissue. If your baby seems to be too small or too big based on the size of your belly, your doctor will do an ultrasound to check his growth.

Red Flag Symptoms

Any of these symptoms could be a sign that something is wrong with your pregnancy.

Use this exercise as a time to train your buttocks as well as burn calories.

Don't wait for your regular prenatal visit to talk about it. Call your doctor right away if you experience:

  • Severe abdominal pain or cramps
  • Severe nausea or vomiting
  • Bleeding
  • Severe dizziness
  • Pain or burning during urination
  • Rapid weight gain (more than 6.5 pounds per month) or too little weight gain

American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: "Skin Conditions During Pregnancy."

Department of Health and Human Services: "Varicose Veins and Spider Veins."

Roberts, J.R., Hedges, J.R., eds., Clinical Procedures in Emergency Medicine, 5th edition, Philadelphia, Saunders Elsevier, 2009.

Gabbe, S.G., Niebyl, J.R., Simpson, J.L., eds., Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies, 5th edition, Philadelphia, Churchill Livingstone Elsevier, 2007.

Bope, E.T., Rakel, R.E., Kellerman, R., eds., Conn's Current Therapy 2010, 1st edition, Philadelphia, Saunders Elsevier, 2009.

Ratcliffe, S.D., Baxley, E.G., Cline, M.K., eds., Family Medicine Obstetrics, Philadelphia, Mosby Elsevier, 2008.

March of Dimes: "Weight Gain During Pregnancy."

Gluten-Free Diet Slideshow

What Is a Gluten-Free Diet?

Before tackling the gluten-free diet, let's get to know our culprit. Gluten is a specific type of protein, but one you won't find in meat or eggs. Instead gluten is found in wheat, rye, and barley. Going gluten-free means avoiding these grains. A gluten-free diet is essential for most people with gluten allergies or celiac disease, a condition which causes intestinal damage when gluten is eaten.

Gluten 'Red Flags'

People on a gluten-free diet need a sharp eye for labels. Some ingredient red flags are obvious, like wheat, wheat gluten, barley, or rye. But some foods have "stealth" gluten. Two terms to watch for are malt (which is made from barley) and hydrolyzed vegetable protein (it often contains wheat). And while oats do not contain gluten, they may also increase symptoms, including abdominal pain, bloating, and diarrhea.

Say Bye-Bye to Bread … Mostly

Perhaps the most difficult step in a gluten-free diet is bidding farewell to bread as you know it -- that includes white, wheat, marble, and rye. Also off limits are bagels, muffins, croissants, hamburger buns, scones -- you get the idea. Yes, even pizza. But don't despair. There are alternatives.

You Have Gluten-Free Bread Choices

Many health foods stores and some major supermarkets now carry gluten-free products, including an assortment of breads. These are often made with rice or potato flour instead of wheat products. Just check the label to make sure it says "100% gluten-free."

Lots of Cereals Have Gluten

Traditional breakfast cereals are another casualty for people on a gluten-free diet. Cream of Wheat is obviously out, but so are many other favorites. Cheerios contains wheat starch, while Frosted Flakes uses malt flavoring.

At least you know that after a week of staying consistent you’ll have a nice little treat for yourself!

Read the list of ingredients and avoid any cereal containing wheat, barley, rye, or malt.

Enjoy Corn and Rice Cereals

Corn and rice-based cereals are good breakfast alternatives, but it's crucial to read labels carefully, as some may also contain malt. You may want to check your supermarket's health-food section for gluten-free products.

A New Twist on Pasta

It's true, no matter what its shape or name, most pasta is made out of wheat. So you'll need to avoid regular spaghetti, macaroni, shells, and spirals when you're on a gluten-free diet. Instead, look for pasta made from rice, corn, or quinoa.

Dig in to Rice and Potatoes

On a gluten-free diet? Say hello to filling, flexible rice and potatoes. You can top them with just about anything, mix them into meals, or enjoy them on their own. Still mourning the loss of your favorite pasta? Here's a secret: When you're really craving a bowl of spaghetti, it is possible to find gluten-free pasta -- just think rice noodles.

Most Crackers Are Made of Wheat

Check out the ingredients label and you'll find that most crackers have wheat as one of their main ingredients. Your mission? Find an alternative venue for your favorite cheeses.

Rev Up Munchies With Rice Cakes

Who needs crackers when rice cakes and corn chips can host all sorts of spreads and dips? Another gluten-free crunchy snack: popcorn.

Beware of Breaded Foods

Check the ingredients, but the crunchy coating on most chicken nuggets and fish sticks is generally made from wheat flour.

Who Misses the Breading?

You don't need to hide the succulent charms of fresh chicken, fish, and beef under a bunch of bread. Go for lean meat without any additives and you'll be eating right for a gluten-free diet. Do keep in mind that hot dogs and deli meats are processed, so check the ingredients for additives that might contain gluten.

Avoid Most Cookies and Cakes

While a gluten-free diet won't contain most traditional cakes, pies, cookies, and other celebratory treats -- which are loaded with wheat flour -- there are still lots of ways to satisfy your sweet tooth.

Enjoy Sweet and Chewy Treats

Marshmallows, gumdrops, plain hard candies -- these are all usually gluten-free. But it doesn’t have to stop there. Look for specialty bakeries that may be able to create custom-ordered gluten-free cakes, pies, and other treats, too.

Beer Contains Gluten -- Who Knew?

Unfortunately for fans of the six-pack, most beers are made with barley malt. While there are some gluten-free beers, it's best to check with your doctor or dietitian about whether these are safe for you.

Cheers! You Can Still Raise a Glass

Wine and liquors are generally gluten-free, so you can still raise a glass and offer a toast, no matter what the occasion.

There's So Much More to Enjoy

Along with wine, potatoes, and rice, there are even more delicious foods and drinks that are safe to enjoy on a gluten-free diet, such as eggs, fish, meat, fruits, vegetables, and milk products.

A small note: When using frozen or canned fruits and vegetables, check for additives that might contain gluten.

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The same goes for processed cheese spreads and flavored yogurts.

When Dining Out, Talk It Out

One of the biggest challenges in maintaining a gluten-free diet is decoding a restaurant menu. Don't be shy. Talk with your server or the chef and explain your dietary needs -- they're there to satisfy you.

Stay Symptom-Free

For most people with celiac disease, even small amounts of gluten can cause symptoms like gas and bloating, changes in bowel movements, weight loss, fatigue, and weakness. That's why going gluten-free can be a big help -- no matter how mild or serious your symptoms. Note: Check with your health care provider before making any major dietary changes.

Gluten-Free Diet and Autism Spectrum Disorder

Some parents believe a gluten-free diet can help children with Autism Spectrum Disorder, although the idea is controversial. The theory suggests children with ASD are sensitive to gluten, and avoiding the protein can improve certain symptoms, such as speech or social behavior. At present, there is not enough research to confirm or refute the effectiveness of gluten-free diets in people with autism.

Going Gluten-Free Is No Cakewalk

The gluten-free diet isn't always easy. People who benefit generally need to stick with the diet for life. That means giving up many staples, such as bread and pasta, and treats like cake and cookies. But it's getting ever easier to find gluten-free alternatives, and careful planning can help you stay gluten-free long-term. Remember: Check with your health care provider before making any major dietary changes.

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Celiac Sprue Association.

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise: “Celiac Disease: Topic Overview.”

This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

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