Garcinia cambogia fda recall

Garcinia cambogia fda recall
Customers begin by placing their order for the Nature’s Pure Cleanse, only paying shipping and handling ($9.99) and they would have 30 days (*18 days if they are in the UK) from that date to call if they are not satisfied with the 30-day supply (60 Capsules) of product.

FDA Recalls Liquid Pharmaceutical Products

Concerns over possible bacterial contamination that could cause severe infections in patients prompted the move

By HeatlthDay staff

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced a recall of numerous liquid pharmaceutical products because of possible bacterial contamination that could cause severe infections in vulnerable patients.

The drugs and dietary supplements, made by PharmaTech LLC in Davie, Fla., include liquid stool softeners, liquid vitamin D drops and liquid multivitamins marketed for infants and children, the agency said in a news release.

Reports of the discovery of Burkholderia cepacia bacteria in both Diocto Liquid and Diocto Syrup prompted the voluntary recall by three companies that label PharmaTech products, the FDA said. The three companies are Rugby Laboratories, Major Pharmaceuticals and Leader Brands.

"B. cepacia poses a serious threat to vulnerable patients, including infants and young children who still have developing immune systems," FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb said in a statement.

"These products were distributed nationwide to retailers, health care facilities, pharmacies and sold online -- making it important that parents, patients and health care providers be made aware of the potential risk and immediately stop using these products," Gottlieb added.

The bacteria pose the greatest danger to hospitalized patients, critically ill patients and people with health problems such as weakened immune systems and chronic lung diseases, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Signs of infection can range from no symptoms at all to serious respiratory infections, the CDC said. The bacteria can spread from person to person by direct contact and is often resistant to common antibiotics.

The FDA advises patients and physicians to stop using these products immediately. Consumers with questions can contact Rugby Laboratories/Major Pharmaceuticals at 800-645-2158, or Leader at 800-200-6313.

Phosphatidylserine

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Phosphatidylserine is a fatty substance called a phospholipid.

Typically the majority are processed and turned in to fat, some of which end up being stored as undesirable weight-- generally on our belly.

It covers and protects the cells in your brain and carries messages between them.

Phosphatidylserine plays an important role in keeping your mind and memory sharp. Animal studies suggest that the level of this substance in the brain decreases with age.

Why do people take phosphatidylserine?

Phosphatidylserine is taken to try to prevent memory loss and mental decline that may occur as you get older.

Several studies suggest that it may boost your brain power. People who took the supplement scored higher on short-term memory, mood, and concentration tests. For example, they could better recall names and objects. Much more research is needed to confirm these results.

Scientists have used phosphatidylserine in studies to treat symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. Again, there is not enough evidence that phosphatidylserine is of any help in treating this condition.

Phosphatidylserine has been suggested in the treatment of the following conditions, as well:

More research is needed before it can be recommended as a treatment for any of these conditions.

Can you get phosphatidylserine naturally from foods?

Phosphatidylserine occurs naturally in small amounts in most foods, slightly more in white beans.

The supplement used in early studies was made from brain cells taken from cattle. Because of concerns about infection with mad cow disease, a virus spread by cattle, scientists have developed a type of phosphatidylserine from plant sources such as soy.

What are the risks of taking phosphatidylserine?

Many people can take the soy-derived supplement without any side effects. Research is still preliminary but it is likely safe up to 600 milligrams a day for no more than 10 days. Side effects are more common at doses of 300 milligrams and above. They may include:

However, optimal doses of phosphatidylserine have not been established for any condition. Quality and active ingredients in supplements may vary widely from maker to maker.

Through the mechanisms of Hydroxycitric Acid or simply HCA: 1.

Total ullshit and I still don’t have my money back Really its a scam.

This makes it very hard to establish a standard dose.

Phosphatidylserine can affect how certain medicines work in your body. Talk to your doctor before taking this supplement if you also take:

  • Any type of blood thinner or have any blood-clotting problems
  • Anti-inflammatory medicines used for arthritis, headaches, or pain
  • Performance-enhancing drugs or supplements used to increase athletic performance or stamina

Always tell your doctor about any supplements you are taking, including natural ones and those bought without a prescription. That way, your doctor can check on any potential side effects or interactions with any medications.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does regulate dietary supplements; however, it treats them like foods rather than medications. Unlike drug manufacturers, the makers of supplements don’t have to show their products are safe or effective before selling them on the market.

Natural Standard: "Phosphatidylserine."

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database: "Phosphatidylserine."

Rakel, D., editor, Integrative Medicine, 3rd edition, Saunders Elsevier, 2012.

Kidd, P.M. Alternative Medical Review. Sept. 1, 2007.

Keren, H. PLoS One. Jan. 1, 2010.

Vakhapova, V. BMC Neurology, June 28, 2011.

Manor, I. European Psychiatry, July 27, 2012.

SlowItDownCKD

Best Six Kidney Disease Blogs of 2016 & 2017; winner Top 75 Nephrology Blogs

Tagged with Psyllium

Cleaning Out

Today I g et to finish the final edits for my novel Portal in Time and submit it to my publisher. That means the next step is cleaning out my files and my computer. Writers accumulate an awful lot of unnecessary material when researching for a book.

That simple thought got me to thinking about another kind of cleaning out, the body kind. By the way, it seems the words cleanse and detox – short for detoxification – are being used interchangeably.

Where the thermogenic Garcinia Slim acts on the fact and prevents fat generation, detox tea or drinks can help in removal of waste from the body and boost overall immunity with all the antioxidants supplied.

Whichever term we use, are they safe for us as Chronic Kidney Disease patients?

But first – there’s always a first, isn’t there? – a warning: if you’re thinking of doing one for weight loss, don’t. According to Medicine.Net at http://www.medicinenet.com/cleansing_and_detox_diets/article.htm,

“There is no scientific evidence that “detox” (short for detoxification) or “cleanse” diets result in rapid weight loss or have any health benefits, says Heather Mangieri, RDN, LDN, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and founder of NutritionCheckUp in Pittsburgh.

Indeed, the opposite may be true: One study published in 2011 in the journal Obesity found that beginning a weight-loss diet with a fast or cleanse could be counterproductive.”

Now wait just a minute, if they provide no ‘rapid weight loss or have any health benefits,’ why do people go to the trouble of doing them? I wrote about this just a bit in relation to brain fog in SlowItDownCKD 2015.

“…with CKD I’d talk over detoxing and/or taking supplements to support cell power with my nephrologist before actually following that advice. Some nephrologists are dead (Yikes! Wrong word choice) set against detoxifying while others have a more eclectic approach to gentle detoxifying.”

Ah, so there MAY be some benefits in relation to brain fog. What’s brain fog again? The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2 (I have got to get around to shortening that title.) can help us out here.

“According to integrative medicine expert Dr. Isaac Eliaz, when experiencing brain fog

‘…people feel as if there is a thick fog dampening their mind. While the medical and mental health establishments don’t generally recognize brain fog as a condition, it’s a surprisingly common affliction that affects people of all ages. Symptoms include pervasive absentmindedness, muddled thought processes, poor memory recall, difficulty processing information, disorientation, fatigue, and others.’

Well, what exactly is a detox?

cambogia extract that decreased volume and acidity of gastric juice.

The Free Dictionary’s medical dictionary at http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/detoxification offers this as one of its definitions:

“A short-term health regimen involving procedures thought to remove toxins from the body, such as drinking large amounts of liquid, eating a restricted diet or fasting, taking nutritional supplements, and undergoing enemas.”

Now we get to the meat of the matter. Why do Chronic Kidney Disease patients need to be so careful about cleanses? I looked at the ingredient list of several different cleanses on Amazon.com. (Click on the ingredient lists to make them larger so you can read them more carefully.) The first product was Super Colon Cleanse. One of the first ingredients was Psyllium Husk Powder 1 g. Uh-oh. Not good for us. As Metamucil Advisor – the manufacturer of fiber products -at http://www.metamuciladvisor.com/avoid-psyllium-and-metamucil-in-kidney-disease/ explains,

“Psyllium husk is a natural fiber that comes from the plant called Plantago Ovata. Plantago Ovata produces thousands of seeds that are coated with a gel like substance that is extracted to create psyllium husk. The psyllium husk is a natural soluble fiber laxative that can be consumed to add bulk to the feces. Consuming psyllium powder will draw water to the stool making it easier to have a bowl movement. Psyllium husk is recommended to not be taken by individuals who have kidney disease because it is high in magnesium that individuals with chronic kidney disease must avoid. It is highly recommended to consult your physician before starting any product of psyllium husk to make sure it is safe with any health conditions you might have.”

Well, that’s only one cleanse. Let’s take a look at another. Dr. Tobias Colon: 14 Day Quick Cleanse is composed of herbs, no psyllium. But there’s a problem there, too. As Chronic Kidney Disease patients we are cautioned against taking herbs, not so much because they will cause damage, but because we don’t know how much of each is safe for our kidneys.

I thought I remembered writing about this in What Is It and How Did I Get It?

Garcinia Cambogia detoxifies the system, making the user more alert.

Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease – another really long title – and decided to find that information. Here it is:

“While none of this is established, the following might be toxic to the kidneys -wormwood, periwinkle, sassafras (I remember drinking sassafras tea as a child. Did that have any effect on my kidneys?) and horse chestnut just to name a few. Then there are the herbal supplements that might be harmful to CKD patients: alfalfa, aloe, bayberry, capsicum, dandelion, ginger, ginseng, licorice, rhubarb and senna. There are others, but they seemed too esoteric to include….”

They say three is the magic number, so let’s take another look. This time as something label ‘detox.’ Baetea 14 Day Teatox is the one I chose. I think I liked the play on words: detox, teatox, a tea to detox. Lots of herbs, but then I looked at the last ingredient – Garcinia Cambogia. That rang a caution bell in my mind so I went right to a site about the side effects of this product at http://garciniacambogiatopic.com/side-effects-garcinia-cambogia/.

“Our kidneys and liver remove toxins, waste and other substances from our body. They are the main organs designed to clean the body of impurities. People who already have diseases of the kidneys or liver should not take Garcinia Cambogia because their bodies might not be able to utilize and remove the supplement effectively.”

*sigh* It looks like we’ll just have to detox the old fashioned way, with increased fiber, as much water as your nephrologist permits, and exercise. You might consider going meat and sugarless, too. Of course, it wouldn’t hurt to cut down on carbs, either. It looks like we, as Chronic Kidney Disease patients, are moving closer and closer to clean eating.