Garcinia diet oprah

Garcinia diet oprah
You'll find it in bottles on the shelf at the store as well as mixed with other ingredients in diet products.

The Lemonade Diet/Master Cleanse

The Promise

Celebrities including Beyoncé have used this diet. But it's far from the principles of healthy eating, and the results aren't likely to last.

The Lemonade Diet, also called the Master Cleanse, is a liquid-only diet consisting of three things: a lemonade-like beverage, salt-water drink, and herbal laxative tea.

The claim is simple: Give it 10 days (or more) and you’ll drop pounds, "detox" your digestive system, and feel energetic, vital, happy, and healthy. You’ll also curb cravings for unhealthy food.

It all started with Stanley Burroughs’s book, The Master Cleanser. There are many variations, and Peter Glickman continues Burroughs’s legacy with his own book, Lose Weight, Have More Energy and Be Happier in 10 Days, and web site.

Does It Work?

Because you're getting so few calories, you'll probably lose weight. You’ll also be losing muscle, bone, and water. And you're likely to gain the weight right back.

There's no proof that detoxifying leads to long-term weight loss. Plus, you don't need to detox your body -- your liver takes care of that.

For lasting change, you're better off eating a healthy diet of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy, and lean proteins like fish, skinless chicken or turkey, and healthy fats like olive oil.

What You Can Eat and What You Can't

You're only allowed a salt-water drink, a "lemonade," and an herbal laxative tea for the first 10 days. You can't have any solid food, and you can’t drink alcohol.

After 10 days, you can gradually add back foods, but only a few at first, starting with juice and soup, and leading to raw fruits and vegetables. After this, the plan calls for eating very little meat and no dairy.

Level of Effort: High

You'll likely be hungry on such a strict diet.

I was not aware that to sign up for a trial would mean that they would keep sending me this stuff.

The web site also says you should expect “detox symptoms” like cravings, tiredness, boredom, and headaches.

Limitations: According to the web site, you must follow the diet exactly or it won’t work and can leave you feeling tired, sick, achy, and with cravings.

Cooking and shopping: You need very few ingredients, and prep work is quick. You can make the drink ahead of time and stash it in the fridge.

Packaged foods or meals: No.

In-person meetings: No.

Does It Allow for Dietary Restrictions or Preferences?

Vegetarians and vegans: Yes.

Low-salt diet: You can swap out the salt-water flush for a cup of herbal laxative tea.

Gluten-free: There is no gluten in the three drinks you're allowed to have on the first 10 days of this diet.

What Else You Should Know

Support: The plan offers free discussion and support groups and an optional online coaching program for $9.95 a month.

Cost: No costs other than buying the ingredients, unless you sign up for the optional online coaching.

What Dr. Hansa Bhargava says:

If weight loss is your goal, it may work temporarily. Anytime you limit your food intake, especially that drastically, you will lose some weight.

The problem is, you will lose muscle mass. This diet puts you at risk for nutritional deficiencies, too. Also, you will likely gain the weight back really quickly once you start eating normally.

Is It Good for Certain Conditions?

No. It's an unhealthy way to temporarily lose weight.

This is not a diet I would do myself or recommend to my friends. If weight loss is the goal, it is better to lose weight gradually with a balanced diet that makes sure you get the nutrients you need.

But you need to lower your overall body fat percentage, and you will get rid of your belly fat.

Also reccommended to be taken with Apple Cider Vinegar Capsules and/or Colon Cleanse.

Cross this one off your list. “The Stars of Dreamgirls.”

American Institute for Cancer Research: “AICR Reviews Fad Diets: Do they deliver?”

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: “Staying Away from Fad Diets;” “Book Review: Fat Flush for Life: The Year-Round Super Detox Plan to Boost Your Metabolism and Keep the Weight Off Permanently;” “Eating Right Isn’t Complicated.”

American Diabetes Association: “Making Healthy Food Choices.”

American Heart Association: “5 Goals to Losing Weight.”

A Diet for B Positive Blood Group

Blood type diets gained popularity in America due in large part to naturopathic physician and founder of the Institute for Human Individuality Peter J. D'Adamo, N.D. D'Adamo's bestselling books, including "Eat Right 4 Your Type" and "Live Right 4 Your Type" promote specific diets based on blood type to improve health. According to D'Adamo, people with a B blood type should eat different foods than people with other types of blood, such as A or O. This theory is based on the premise that proteins in your food, called lectins, react with your blood, and that certain lectins are more compatible with some blood types than others.

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Diet Basics

According to proponents of blood type diets, eating food tailored to your blood type will help you store less fat in your body, fight off and avoid diseases and feel better and healthier overall. D'Adamo also claims that people with different blood types digest lectins, or food proteins, in different ways. Blood type diet enthusiasts also say people should eat the same kinds of foods that their ancestors with similar blood types ate. Since, according to D'Adamo, people with type B blood were traditionally nomads, they should eat a more varied diet than those with other blood types.

What to Eat

D'Adamo's blood type diet does not differentiate between positive or negative blood types.

Then you’ll have an idea of how much you are eating.

Whether you have B positive or B negative blood, D'Adamo suggests a diet that balances both animal and vegetable selections. Those with B type blood should eat "beneficial meats" such as lamb, goat, rabbit, mutton and venison. B positive and B negative blood types should balance their meat selection with green vegetables, eggs and low-fat dairy.

What to Avoid

For those with type B positive or B negative blood, D'Adamo recommends avoiding wheat, buckwheat, corn, lentils, peanuts, sesame seeds and tomatoes. He asserts that these foods compromise the B blood type group's metabolism and can cause fluid retention, fatigue and hypoglycemia. D'Adamo also notes that the B group should avoid chicken, because it contains what he calls an "agglutinating lectin" that can attack the bloodstream of a person with type B blood and potentially cause immune disorders or strokes.

According to New York University Langone Medical Center, the Blood Type Diet is not supported by scientific evidence. Further concern lies in the fact that certain foods are restricted for certain blood types, making it difficult for the participant to obtain all nutrients necessary for health. The American Academy of Family Physicians similarly criticizes blood type diets, listing them as "fad" diets.


Talk to your doctor about how to maintain a healthy weight and improve your overall health and nutrition, no matter what your blood type. Instead of fad diets, the American Academy of Family Physicians suggests eating a balanced and varied diet incorporating lots of fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Don't skip meals, pay attention to your portion sizes and limit sodium, sugar, cholesterol, trans fat and saturated fat.

If someone had a bad experience with a product they will also share that as well.

Finally, engage in physical exercise regularly to stay fit and healthy.

Types of Foods to Avoid for B Positive Blood Type

The first Asian nomads are your ancient ancestors if you have B-positive or B-negative blood, claims Peter J. D'Adamo, the creator of the blood type diet. According to D'Adamo, following a diet that restricts or eliminates the foods these nomads would not have eaten will help a person with type-B blood lose weight, feel more energetic and avoid medical problems. In 2014, a study published in "Plos One" concluded that there is no evidence to support the premise underlying the blood type diet. Before you start any part of the plan, talk to your doctor.

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Stay Away from Wheat

A person with B-positive blood is told to avoid all forms of wheat on the blood type diet, including whole-wheat bread products, durum wheat products, bulgur, wheat germ, wheat bran, shredded wheat and cream of wheat. Consuming wheat will supposedly increase the chance of diabetes and weight gain. In addition, type-B people should avoid buckwheat, rye, couscous, soba noodles, wild rice and cornmeal.

Avoid Poultry

Chicken, goose, duck and quail are not recommended for type-B individuals, as D'Adamo claims that chicken in particular contains compounds that can increase a type-B person's risk of immune problems and stroke. While lamb, venison, mutton and some types of fish are recommended, the blood type diet also discourages people with B-positive blood from consuming any type of pork, anchovies, striped bass, octopus, smoked salmon and shellfish like mussels, shrimp, oysters and lobster.

Pick Dairy Carefully

Unlike the diet advice given to type-A and type-O people on the blood type diet plan, type-B people are allowed dairy products in moderation, including cow's milk, eggs, buttermilk and cheeses such as cheddar, Swiss, Monterey jack and Brie.

And that we should not fear toxicity when taking it.

But they are instructed to avoid ice cream and three specific types of cheeses: string cheese, blue cheese and processed American cheese.

Limit Plant-Based Protein

Certain plant-based proteins should be considered off-limits for people with type-B blood, contends D'Adamo. These include peanuts, which he says will inhibit the liver and cause a drop in blood sugar, as well as sesame seeds and lentils, which allegedly prevent proper nutrient absorption in type-B individuals. Cashews, pistachios, black-eyed peas, pinto beans, black beans, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds and tofu are examples of other restricted foods.

Watch Out for Certain Produce

D'Adamo encourages people with B-positive blood to enjoy a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables but cautions them to steer clear of pomegranates, coconuts, rhubarb, all types of olives, artichokes, radishes, tomatoes, avocados, pumpkin and mung bean sprouts. Corn, which D'Adamo says will slow a type-B person's metabolism and increase his risk of diabetes, should be particularly avoided.

Skip the Soda

The blood type program advises all people to eliminate or restrict processed and commercial foods from their diets, but it especially warns type-B individuals to avoid consuming carbonated beverages, including club soda, regular or diet cola and seltzer water. They are allowed to consume beer and wine in moderation but should not have distilled liquor while following the plan.